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No want, just do.

March 9th, 2009

Over the past couple years, I’ve heard a lot of people speak of me in terms of triathlon racing as someone who puts a lot of pressure on himself.  I don’t ever recall internalizing these comments,…they really meant nothing to me, afterall who cares?  So what?  What’s the big deal?  Maybe I really wanted to perform well at races, and yes, I’d often say things in my head like, ‘yeah, I really want to do well at this race’.  I also recall using this very desire to perform at specific races as motivation to train hard.

So, I’d enter races and focus on performing, with thoughts like, “this is it,…let’s do it…let’s make this race happen”.  Is this a problem?  No – not really,…well, I don’t think so.  Could the more I focus on wanting to do well, act as a distraction from focusing on things that really matter?  I think this could be likely.

So how does someone rid themself of excess pressure?  I don’t know,…does it help that I recognize it as a problem?  I hope it counts for something…

Is it possible to build up, train, load, recover, eat and sleep as an athlete without focusing on WANTING,..while putting all the emphasis on the DOING?  Yes, I believe it is possible, as I know that’s exactly what the winners do.  I don’t ever recall ever hearing a future winner ever say, ‘I really WANT to do well at this race’,…they focus on a concrete vision with internalized confidence; unexplainable by words.   I have a theory that the words come out more when the confidence is less.

You have free reign to give me a good ‘ol slap in the face if I start talking about how much I WANT to perform well this year.  I’ve self-talked myself silly over the years; no more WANTING, DREAMING, and DESIRING.

Do and execute – this is all that matters.  I’ve got a long way to go; and by no means am I pretending that I know anything about what I’m talking about.  But I’m hoping I’m shifting my mental preparedness in the right direction.

Stay in the moment, and don’t fear what you don’t know.

Scott